Archive for October, 2011

October 31, 2011

Procrastination – It’s Your Death

ProcrastinationSo I noticed that all the red flags I had amassed on my emails as I tried to clear things out for Halloween fun tonight. It seems I have prioritized myself into a corner. O.K., the reality is that I procrastinated myself into a corner. Frankly, I forgot to follow my own Zombie Zen advice.

So procrastination has been the death of me and now I will be risen from the dead and go back to practicing my Zombie Zen and clear out some of these red flags and get on the ball for creating new blogs, responding to emails, advancing projects, and well pretty much the other stuff I kept pushing off to get the quick hits that weren’t of enough value done.

Will you remember to do the Zombie Zen or just procrastinate to death?

Check out the image creators work.

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October 13, 2011

Overheard on the Subway – Good Start Up Advice

by: Mike Alwill
commentary / formatting by: Doc Harvard

Doc Harvard: It’s not often in the start up world that you get clean, straight forward and non-snake oil advice but I believe that Mike Alwill from Google has hit on something solid here. Normally I have a picture with my blogs but for this one I will forgo it to bring more focus on what is being said.

Take it away Mike –

What We Hear When We Listen

I have a tendency to overhear other people’s conversations without even trying. While at a bar, walking down the street or riding home on the subway, the words just find their way to me and all of a sudden I’m an audience member to someone else’s discussion.

Last night on my ride home I overheard three guys (a white dude, a black dude and an asian dude) discussing hiring strategy for startups. From their speech and clothing, I could tell they: A) had been drinking and B) were business students at NYU (they specifically mentioned the school several times).

The white dude also seemed to have his own startup (of 10 people) and was imparting his past experiences on the other two guys. Some of the topics included:

  1. Joint-hosting a party of several startups that required each attendee to bring two people who were not in a startup but who would be good for one
  2. The need to drink with a candidate to get their honest stance on particular issues
  3. Making sure you find out that a candidate would “go to happy hour with you at 3pm on a Tuesday but stay at work until midnight on Wednesday”
  4. Difficulty during salary negotiations such as “offering someone $33k but not knowing how to react if they ask for more OR the worry that if they do accept, maybe you could’ve offered them even less”
  5. How startups don’t make formal offers but instead are likely to make an offer while out drinking with a friend or candidate

The general theme seemed to be about assessing candidates and making sure you figure out how to get at their inner selves so you know if you’re getting someone of quality which from what I could infer seemed to be someone who drinks, doesn’t take a high salary and follows whatever work schedule you want them to.

Not once did these guys mention selling or proving themselves to the candidate as a justification for why a candidate would want to devote themselves to their startups.

This is why I can’t stand the majority of entrepreneurs:

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October 12, 2011

Google+ Plus Hashtags

Hashtag

Google+ Twittering

I expect to be reading in all the various Negative Nancy articles about Google+ of how it’s copying Twitter now. Well perhaps Google Plus is, in a way, but a good idea is a good idea. Just ask Facebook about all the things they’ve copied from Google+, Twitter, MySpace and some of the other outside of the U.S. social networks they’ve copied from.

Does Google Plus Need Hashtags?

The short answer is no, Google+ does not need hashtagging. The Search Google+ box does just fine. That being said, I still think it’s good idea. Makes it a lot easier to find topic chains and has the potential to inspire some people to dig deeper in the topic chain.

How Does Google+ Hashtags Benefit a Designer?

Internally, perhaps it doesn’t benefit a designer inside of a typical company. Outside though, now that’s a completely different situation.

Here’s a what if

You have a project that you’re sharing publicly through Google+. You want a way to not only keep it organized but a way for those folks who have you circled to be able dig down deeper and follow your topic thread. Even better, someone new comes along and thinks your project is just the ultimate spiffy wow. Now, instead of using one of the alternative methods all they have to do is click on the #hashtag and they can follow the topic chain you’ve conveniently set up for them.

So no, Google Plus doesn’t need Twitter style hashtagging but it’s a damn good idea and very useful.

Update: Got word from Altay Akgun that the hashtag link conversion doesn’t work on the iPhone ap. You can still use the hashtagging like targeted keywords for the iPhone ap though.

October 3, 2011

Twitter Google Plus Facebook Pseudonym and Real Names

Twitter Google Plus Facebook Pseudonym and Real Names
Juliet

‘Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
What’s Montague? it is nor hand, nor foot,
Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part
Belonging to a man. O, be some other name!
What’s in a name? that which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet;
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call’d,
Retain that dear perfection which he owes
Without that title. Romeo, doff thy name,
And for that name which is no part of thee
Take all myself.

Shakespeare

Pseudonyms and Real Names

Many people have pseudonyms, most everyone in Hollywood. Some use them for professional reasons and some use them for personal reason. Some use pseudonyms to create value associated with a name different than their legal name. This identity can be whatever it needs to be while the real person can live their life. Some people use pseudonyms to hide from malicious ex-spouses, as part of witness protection programs, to be free from the prying eyes of employers and the list goes on. A lot of the advocates for the use of real names say that the only people who are worried about having their name exposed are people that have something to hide. The other argument is that you don’t have to use the services. Both of these are falsehoods.

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